Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend World Congress on Molecular Biology Dubai, UAE .

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Mark G Bloom

Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar

Keynote: Academic Technology Transfer at Sidra: A Focus on Open Innovation

Time : 09:00-09:45

OMICS International Molecular Biology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mark G Bloom photo
Biography:

Mark G Bloom is the Director of the Office of Technology Transfer and is responsible for leading the long-term growth of Sidra’s technology transfer program. In addition to the traditional duties of overseeing Sidra’s intellectual property rights portfolio, he is responsible for developing technology transfer and intellectual property rights management strategies that support Sidra’s mission to become a world-class academic health center focusing on women’s and children’s health. Sidra expects to become a regional leader in moving innovation and research to the commercial marketplace and is looking to its Office of Technology Transfer to play a leading role in realizing that goal

Abstract:

Over the past two decades, biomedical knowledge has grown exponentially, giving us completely new insights into how life works. Astonishing advances in genomics, bioinformatics, imaging and stem cell medicine are offering up possibilities that were unimaginable just a few years ago. New tools that will allow us not only to heal disease but to also predict it and prevent it are finally within our reach. This is more than just a revolution in science and health care; it is a revolution in the human condition. However, because of regional and international economic changes and uncertainties, core systemic financial support for basic research is decreasing or becoming more competitive to obtain, especially for younger researchers at a time when the pace of biomedical innovation and its concurrent translational development and adoption should be increasing to address unmet health care needs. What can we do in view of this new (fiscal) reality? Expertise, experience, resources, and technology must be cross-linked in entirely new ways to establish even more efficient and effective collaborative public-private partnerships to accelerate the advancement of biomedical science. The adoption of “open innovation” programs and platforms could be an important step in attaining this goal, while such an initiative would be especially useful in the MENA Region given its unique characteristics. The benefits and various key challenges of adopting an “open innovation” project in an academic medical center setting will be discussed in this presentation.

  • Genetic Engeneering| Nano Science| Biomedical and Translational Research | Microbiology | Molecular Biology| Genome Engineering | Biotechnology & its applications| Microbial Genomics
Location: Salon-V
Speaker

Chair

Mark G Bloom

Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar

Speaker

Co-Chair

V Rajendran,

Centre for Nano Science and Technology, India

Session Introduction

V Rajendran

Centre for Nano Science and Technology, India

Title: Development of nanocomposite materials for biomedical applications
Speaker
Biography:

V Rajendran is the Professor and Director of R&D and Centre for Nano Science and Technology, K. S. Rangasamy College of Technology, India. He has published more than 204 research papers in peer reviewed international journals, 125 papers in conference proceedings, 25 text books, 2 research books, 1 monograph, 1 compendium book, 14 edited research books, 7 edited conference proceedings and 15 patents

Abstract:

 

The biomaterials with unique physicochemical behaviors are currently attracted for different biomedical applications such as surgical materials, implants and replacement devices. An increasing demand for newer surgical implants in prosthetic and orthopedic applications requires engineering of nanostructured materials with enhanced biological properties. The high purity nanobiomaterials like titania nanocomposites (TiO2-Chitosan, TiO2-Graphene, etc.), metal oxides doped hydroxyapatite (nano silicon doped HAp), nanobioactive glass composites (NBG glasses) etc., are synthesized over wide range of compositions using conventional methods. Comprehensive characterizations of the prepared nanobiomaterials are used to explore the properties like mechanical strength, anticorrosive, antimicrobial, biocompatibility, in vitro bioactivity, etc., and to confer the optimized composition, to meet out the demand exist in biomedical field. The toxicological behavior of the prepared nanocomposites is assessed through in vitro studies using simulated body fluid and animal cell lines, while the in vivo studies using zebrafish. The optimized concentration of nanobiomaterials is further coated on commercial implants namely stainless steel (SS304) and Ti alloy to validate their efficiency in conferring the properties like anticorrosive and antimicrobial, biocompatibility and bioresorbability. Similarly, the nanocomposite materials are used as dental fillers and dental carries prevention applications. The obtained results reveal the promising applications of these nano biomaterials as potential candidate in tissue engineering and bone regenerative applications.

 

Farah Ibrahim Al-Marzooq

Research Institute of Medical & Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, UAE

Title: The oral microbiome and salivary biomarkers in health and disease

Time : 11:15-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Farah Ibrahim Al-Marzooq is a medical doctor specialized in microbiology. She has completed her PhD degree (with thesis distinction) from the Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in 2015. During her PhD study, she was able to identify 3 novel genevarients (related to antibiotic resistance) reported for the fi rst time at the global level. She is currently working as a postdoctoral research associate in the Research Institute of Medical & Health Sciences , University of Sharjah , UAE. Her research work was published in several reputable international journals.

 

Abstract:

The oral microbiome plays a relevant role in human health and it is a key element in a variety of oral and systemic diseases.Th ere is a relation between oral and systemic diseases, but the question remains whether the oral diseases are the causeor theconsequence of pathological process in other body sites. We aim to compare the bacterial community and the level ofselected biomarkers in the saliva of adults in health and disease conditions. 90 saliva samples were collected from three equalgroups (obese with diabetes, obese without diabetes and healthy control). Resistin (a biomarker of insulin resistance) was measured in saliva using ELISA technique. Real-time PCR was used to quantify selected bacterial species associated with ora linfections. Salivary resistin was signifi cantly higher in the obese patients (diabetics and non-diabetics) compared to the healthycontrol. Fusobacterium (associated with gingivitis), Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia (associated withperiodontitis) were detected in signifi cantly higher quantities in the obese patients (diabetics and non-diabetics) comparedto the healthy control. No correlation was found between the levels of salivary resistin and diff erent oral bacteria. Th is study highlighted the importance of saliva as a non-invasive sample for the detection of biomarkers and microbes associated with oral and systemic diseases. Th is may pave the way for more eff ective diagnostic and therapeutic methods which can contributeto the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine.

Meonis Pithawala

Uka Tarsadia University, India

Title: Nanotoxicity-nano threat to nature

Time : 11:45-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Meonis Pithawala is presently working as an Assistant Professor at C G Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University, India. He has 19 research papers and 9 review articles published in peer reviewed national and international journals. He has presented oral presentations at 2 international conferences. He has remained Principal Investigator for government funded major research project. He is a Reviewer in more than five international journals, Member of Institutional Animal Ethical Committee and is associated with couple of administrative and examination bodies of the university. He is also a Member of the Society for Ethnopharmacology, Kolkata, India.

Abstract:

Production of nanoparticles is ever increasing with concomitant development of nanotechnologies. Current core concern is on the biological properties of nanoparticles and in fact is a subject of active consideration. Till date, no specific conclusion is derived about their actual harmful effects. Recent nanotoxicity studies have mainly focused on the health risks to healthy adult human population. The nanotoxicity effects on susceptible organisms with simpler systems such as bacteria, earthworms, fishes, chick embryos have often been overlooked. Since the morphological, anatomical, physiological and genetic structures differ in these organisms, from those as in human, they often suffer more damage from the same exposure. Therefore, the present comprehensive study was initiated to check possible toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in sensitive biological systems like growth of E. coli and S. aureus, micronuclei in earthworm coelomocytes, fish gill chromosomes, skeletal defects in chicken embryos and compared with damage in bone marrow chromosomes of mouse and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, after acute or chronic in vitro exposure. Virtually in all biological systems studied, we found toxicity of both SWCNT as well as MWCNT. The present study describes in details fine analysis of toxicity in different systems explaining probable mechanisms of nanotoxicity. For studying nanomaterial interactions, novel approaches are required since they are novel chemicals. In order to foresee and prevent the potentially harmful effects of nanoparticles in nature, on health and the environment in particular, the results of the present study will be of considerable help.

Speaker
Biography:

Kashaf Junaid has completed her PhD from the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of The Punjab, Pakistan. She also did research work in Bart’s Institute of Primary Health Care, Queens Mary University of London. She is working as an Assistant Professor in The University of Lahore, Pakistan

Abstract:

Vitamin D, a fat soluble vitamin, is well known for calcium homeostasis. Deficiency of vitamin D is not only linked with rickets or osteomalacia but with many other infectious and metabolic disorders. Emerging evidences suggest the relation of vitamin D deficiency in tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to investigate the association of vitamin D deficiency with tuberculosis and to see its impact on anti-tuberculous response. We recruited 260 TB patients from Gulab Devi Chest Hospital, Lahore who had yet not started anti TB treatment for this admission. Any patient with co morbidity or age above 60 years was excluded. Serum 25(OH) D was measured in TB cases, contacts of TB patients and controls from general population. Baseline vitamin D status was significantly associated with TB (P<0.01). Mean vitamin D level in TB patients was 23 nmol per L which is much lower than TB contacts and controls from general population. Sputum smear sample for the presence of acid fast bacilli was examined after every two weeks for all included cases, till sputum converted negative for AFB. Survival analysis indicates that patients with deficiency of vitamin D required more time to sputum smear conversion (median days 22.5, IQR 22.5-37.5). And this association of vitamin D with response to anti-tuberculous treatment was genotype independent. Allelic discrimination assay for VDR, CYP2R1 and VDB indicate none of these SNPs are associated with vitamin D deficiency and not with incidence of tuberculosis. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pulmonary TB patients indicates that vitamin D is a risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis. Furthermore, its impact in response to anti-tuberculous treatment also explains its significant role in the management of tuberculosis. As early sputum smear conversion can break the chain of infection and further spread of tuberculosis. Therefore, maintaining vitamin D status in TB patients might be helpful to control tuberculosis.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed R Mohaisen has completed his BSc degree in General Biological Sciences and MSc degree in Medical Microbiology, Anbar University, Iraq. He is currently a PhD student at the Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Abstract:

Stx bacteriophages are responsible for the dissemination to and production of Shiga toxin genes (stx) in the Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). These toxigenic bacteriophage hosts can cause severe, life-threatening illness and Shiga toxin (Stx) is responsible for the severe nature of EHEC infection. At the point of infection, the injected phage DNA can direct its integration into the bacterial chromosome becoming a prophage; the host cell is then known as a lysogen. Unusually, our model Stx phage, Φ24B, can integrate into at least four distinct sites with in the E. coli genome that shared no easily identifiable recognition sequence pattern. The identification of what are actually required for phage and bacterial DNAs recombination has been tested using both an in vitro and in situ recombination assays. These assays enable easy manipulation of bacterial attachment site (attB) and phage attachment site (attP) sequences. The aim of our study is to fully characterize the requirements of this promiscuous integrase, carried by the Stx phage Φ24B (IntΦ24B), to drive integration. So far, a number of successful assays have enabled us to identify the minimal necessary flanking sequences for all of four attB sites (50 bp each side) and attP site (150 bp each side). The later one is very similar in size to the lambda attP (117 bp each side of the crossover site). Moreover, within these four attB sites, we have identified the primary site.

Eiman M A Mohammed

Kuwait Cancer Control Centre, Kuwait

Title: Molecular Basis of Multiple Sclerosis explains the disease pathophysiology

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Eiman M A Mohammed has completed her MSc in Molecular Biology from Kuwait University, College of Medicine. She is currently working at the Immunology Laboratory in the Kuwait Cancer Control Centre, the only referable laboratory for organ transplantation testing, autoimmune disease testing and HLA typing. She has published two papers on multiple sclerosis

Abstract:

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex, multifactorial autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that causes inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration. The increased prevalence of this disease in Arabian Gulf Countries (AGCs) has captivated many over the last several years. To explain the disease pathophysiology, one must consider the smallest variant within the body; the cell. Understanding the plethora of cellular variables involved is critical to help clarify why such disease tends to increase in these populations. MS develops from the interaction of different genetic and environmental factors. Genetic, epigenetic and even mitochondrial genomic variants are all associated with immune response initiation, facilitation of migration through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), inflammatory molecule mediation and the attack of cellular components. Collectively, this culminates in CNS demyelination and predisposition to MS symptoms. More so, environmental modulators such as vitamin D, UVR, EBV infection, smoking and obesity, influence disease pathophysiology through modulation of gene transcription, thereby predisposing to MS. Detailed knowledge of susceptibility factors underlying any disease is essential to properly understand disease pathophysiology, especially if correlated with population-related variables.

Speaker
Biography:

Dhruti Mistry is currently pursuing her PhD in Applied Sciences (Biotechnology) from Uka Tarsadia University, India. She is also working as a Teaching Assistant at C G Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology. She has 4 research papers and 6 review articles published in peer reviewed national and international journals. She is a Member of the Society for Ethnopharmacology, Kolkata, India

Abstract:

It is well established that radiation exposure causes DNA damage. Compounds within certain plants have often been targeted as protectors against radiation induced DNA damage. In the present study, use of aqueous-methanolic extracts (50 µg per ml) from bark of Alstonia scholaris as radioprotectors has been reported. The cytogenetic parameters studied as indices for DNA damage were Chromosomal Aberrations (CAs) and Micronuclei (MN) frequency from human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Blood was irradiated to 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy of X-rays radiation (Source: 6MV X-ray Photons, Siemens, Oncor Expression Medical Linear Accelerator). The irradiated samples were exposed to aqueous-methanolic bark extracts under three different situations: To rule out whether presence of components in extract may not allow the damage to take place, blood samples were irradiated, simultaneously exposed to extracts and then cultured; to rule out the possibility of possible DNA damage repair capability of extracts, blood samples were irradiated and cultured for 24 hours and then exposed to extracts; and to rule out the possibility of possible radioprotective properties of the extracts, blood samples were exposed to extracts first, cultured for 24 hours and then exposed to radiation. In all three conditions, we found that presence of extracts had significant contribution in the reduction of DNA damage, measured both as CAs as well as MN frequency. Since the study used crude extracts, number of compounds present in the extracts might have played a role, some as protectors, some as mitigators and still certain with DNA damage repair capabilities. Once the actual compounds present in the extracts be determined and their probable role be decided in reducing radiation induced DNA damage, new sort of drugs be formulated with potential to protect against radiation damage.

Speaker
Biography:

Sanjukta Chakrabarti is currently pursuing her PhD from Deakin University, Australia. She has completed MSc in Biochemistry from Calcutta University, followed by MTech in Biomedical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Mumbai, India. She is a Senior Scientist working with Reliance Life Sciences, a premier organization dealing with pharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals, molecular medicine, regenerative medicine and clinical research in Mumbai, India. She has published 4 papers in reputed journals and has been working in biopharmaceutical industry for the last 15 years.

Abstract:

Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and VEGF is the most potent pro-angiogenic factor that stimulates angiogenesis in diseases such as cancer metastasis, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathies, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Hence, blocking VEGF is the best way to prevent angiogenesis. An anti-VEGF, Fc-fusion protein, VEGFR1(D1-D3)-Fc, was developed in-house, using recombinant DNA technology. VEGFR1(D1-D3)-Fc fusion gene was generated by PCR amplification, followed by fusion of genes encoding the first three extracellular domains of VEGFR1 and human IgG1-Fc region. The fusion gene was cloned in expression vector, pXC17.4, following which it was used to transfect mammalian cell line, CHOK1SV GS-KO. However, protein degradation was observed during production of indigenous VEGFR1(D1-D3)-Fc and measures were taken to inhibit proteolytic cleavage of the fusion trap. The Fc-fusion protein was characterized the in terms of molecular weight, secondary and tertiary structure, thermal stability, purity, isoelectric point and glycosylation profiling. Strong binding affinity of the fusion traps for VEGF-A was demonstrated and the angiogenesis-inhibitory functions were confirmed, both in cell-based assays as well as a xenograft animal model. VEGFR1(D1-D3)-Fc was demonstrated to have potential in advancing in the pipeline of anti-cancer drug development. Since the VEGFR1(D1-D3)-Fc protein has high binding affinity for VEGF, it will remove circulating VEGF from the system, thus inhibiting the downstream signaling giving rise to cell survival and proliferation. Hence, this anti-VEGF molecule will act as a very effective anti-angiogenic agent, as has already been shown in in vitro and in vivo experiments.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Zainab Zahid Saadoon is an Assistant Lecturer at College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Iraq. She has completed her MSc and currently pursuing PhD at College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Iraq

Abstract:

Background: Neural stem cells are not confined to the embryonic development of the brain as believed in the past; in contrasts, it continues life-long in the adult mammalian brains even in non-pathological state. Neural stem cells and their progeny, the neuroblasts are residents in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in the adult mammalian brains. The neuroblasts after they were produced in the SVZ would migrate in a well-defined pathway emerged from the SVZ and directed towards the olfactory bulb (OB). This pathway is called the Rostral Migratory Stream (RMS) and its main components are the neuroblasts.
Aims: To trace the chain arrangement of neuroblasts along the RMS using Hematoxylin and Eosin and the specific marker of the neuroblasts "anti-doublecortin antibody”, describing grossly how the pathway emerges from SVZ proceeding rostrally to the OB in the adult mice brains.
Materials & Methods: Adult mice brains from both brain sexes were used in this experiment to view both coronal and sagittal sections upon which Hematoxylin and Eosin and immunohistochemical staining were exploited. Anti-doublecortin antibody, the specific marker of the immature neurons was used in the immunohistochemical staining of this study.
Results: This study revealed clustering of the neuroblasts in the SVZ and while this special arrangement carried out at the SVZ, the neuroblasts changed their arrangement when being traced sagittaly into chain-like strip of cells forming a sigmoidal shape stream. The chain of the neuroblasts in the stream demonstrated changing in shape and direction throughout its length with special arrangement at its starter from the lateral ventricle forming a funnel shape limb before joining the rest of stream. It delineated four limbs here along its pathway.
Conclusion: The neuroblasts take different arrangement through their period of life from their site of origin to their final destination, the olfactory bulb through the RMS. In the stream the neuroblasts follow a sigmoidal shape pathway described here as four limbs instead of 3 ones in previous studies. The new described part is the funnel shape limb which is named the infundibulum at which the neuroblasts in the stream starting up their migration from SVZ before they join the next limb, the vertical limb.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammad Farahmandnia is a undergraduate Medical Doctor student at Shiraz University of Medical Science. He is a holder of Silver Medals in Biology and Basic Medical Science Olympiads. He has also co-authored 6 papers in reputed journals on stem cell research. He is currently a Member of Cell and Molecular Medicine Student Research Group with particular focus on systems biology of aging

Abstract:

There is huge debate regarding whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the cause for aging. Meta-analyses indicate antioxidants have little effect, if any, on lifespan. This mandates the need for rethinking causality of ROS in senescence. In this article, high quality studies (n=20) were sorted into three categories: Basic, clinical/meta-analytic and ROS-mTOR relationship. Evidences were compared to discover inconsistencies and bigger-picture revelations. Studies showed simultaneity of mTORC1 activity and increased ROS. Basic studies suggested that ROS causes cell damage and genomic instability leading to aging. Nevertheless, meta-analyses clarify antioxidants have literally zero outcome affecting lifespan. This questions the causal role of ROS in senescence. Considering that hyperactive mTORC1 intensifies aging while decreasing ROS has little benefit, ROS could be thought of as mere chemical by products with no causal role and can be eliminated from the picture. This new perspective also indicates that it is the time to look for other roles for ROS rather than regarding it as the cause of senescence.

Speaker
Biography:

Timothy Auta is currently a Doctoral degree candidate in University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he has obtained his Master’s degree in 2011. He is a young Faculty Member at Federal University Dutsinma, Katsina State, Nigeria and teaches Biology. He has published 13 papers in reputed journals and presented several papers at different academic conferences/meetings.

Abstract:

The use of wood-ash extracts, including that of Parkia biglobosa as food additives and for medicinal purposes by Gbagyi, Koro, Ebira and other ethnic groups in the Middle-Belt Region of Nigeria, without knowledge of its possible reproductive toxicity has been an age long practice. This study thus investigated the toxicity of aqueous wood-ash extracts of P. biglobosa on male reproductive ability, using mice as models. Aqueous extraction of the wood ash of P. biglobosa was performed using the traditional percolation method. Four different dose levels of 0, 5, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight were administered to 20 male mice (five per group) for seven days, which were sacrificed 35 days thereafter. Gonadosomatic index, sperm motility, sperm count, sperm morphology, serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone assay and histopathology of testes were carried out using standard methods. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANOVA, considered significant at P<0.05. Though no significant toxic effect on testicular weight, FSH, LH and testosterone was recorded, sperm motility, live/dead sperm and sperm count decreased significantly with significant increase of abnormal sperm cells when compared to control. Dose dependent depletion of spermatogenic cells were recorded in the testes. Aqueous wood-ash extract of P. biglobosa had damaging effects on sperm cells and testicular tissues, which could compromise reproductive potentials

Speaker
Biography:

Priti Saxena completed her PhD in Chemical Biology from National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi. She worked as a Scientist Fellow at Institute ofGenomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi and has published several articles in reputed high impact journals. She has been awarded with the premier fellowship of Innovative Young Biotechnologist Award (IYBA) of DBT, India and SAU Intramural Grant of South Asian University, India. Her research interests focus on delineating molecular mechanisms underlying mycobacterial pathogenesis in the capacity of an Assistant Professor at South Asian University, India.

Abstract:

Corynebacterineae includes some of the deadliest human pathogens such as, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium leprae. In Recent years have seen a remarkable increase in our understanding of secondary metabolic networks that impart these potentials to this order of organisms. One of the major secondary metabolites is polyketides. Comparative genomics of closely related genera from this family have revealed unusual polyketide biosynthetic potentials with the existence of genes homologous to type III pkss. Type III polyketide products in recent years have been remarkably associated with cell wall modifications. Long-chain alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones replace membrane phospholipids in Azotobacter cells differentiating into dormant cells. Alkyl phloroglucinols are key signaling factors required for differentiation and development of Dictyostelium molds. These phenolic lipids in Streptomyces confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by altering properties of the cytoplasmic membrane. Although, resorcinolic/phloroglucinolic lipids are not known in Mtb, our functional characterization of PKS18 identified alkylpyrones as major polyketide products in vitro. These metabolites are crucial components of pollen exine in Arabidopsis thaliana and could be synthesized by PKSIIINc from Neurospora crassa. Type III polyketide quinones have been recently identified to be key molecules required for anaerobic respiration in mycobacterial biofilms. Interestingly, many of the type III polyketides require modifying enzymes in order to become fully functional. These modifying enzymes are generally cytochrome P450s, desaturases, methyltransferases, sulfotransferases, oxidoreductases and others. Often these modifying enzymes are present in cluster with type III pks genes and transcriptionally expressed together. In this study, we have identified two unique polyketide clusters in Mycobacterium marinum. Our biochemical, mutational and structural studies provide evidence for an unanticipated potential of these proteins to cyclize a common biosynthetic intermediate to generate chemically and structurally distinct metabolic entities utilizing a single catalytic site and a limited pool of precursor molecules. These metabolites are variously modified to become biologically active. These observations not only provide interesting clues to the possible role of these small molecules in Corynebacterineae physiology and virulence but can be further exploited for generating a reservoir of structurally and chemically distinct unnatural bioactive scaffolds.

Speaker
Biography:

Srinivasa Rao Jammi has completed his PhD and DSc from IIT Kharagpur and Postdoctoral studies from University of Surrey. He is the President of The Vibration Institute of India, a premier institute promoting world wide academic and industrial research. He has published more than 170 papers in reputed journals and 275 in conferences worldwide. He is the Chief Editor of International Journal of Vibration Engineering and Technology and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of several reputed journals. He is a Consultant for over 30 industries worldwide, received over 30 awards, written over 20 books and Member of several societies.

Abstract:

Man has been always curious in knowing about Earth and Universe around. The first success in scientific understanding was provided by Newton in 17th century with an understanding of gravity that was limited for forces between objects: E.g., Sun and Earth or simply an Apple falling on earth. Einstein a century ago; introduced gravitational waves that communicate information between two colliding objects through space-time; problem of action at a distance. However they were elusive for measurement until recently. It is only recently on 15th September 2015 their measurement was achieved and announced on 11th February 2016; Two Laser Interferometry Gravitational Observatories (LIGO) built in USA, measured this minutely small value of 10-22 that has the accuracy of measurement of a hundred of the diameter of a proton in an atom. We will first explain this measurement. Several phenomena that happened on earth e.g., Pangea broke and drifted from the South Pole, the force behind their movement is not properly understood. Gravitational waves seem to provide the answer. The earth has also seen alternate chills and global warming. This paper provides an FE model of earth and the rise in temperature that occurs over long periods. Yet another unexplained phenomenon is the tectonic plate movement, e.g., Gondwana land traveling over 50 million years pushing the Eurasian plate and forming Himalayan ranges. The earthquakes attributed here due to the plate movement can be also attributed to gravitational waves. An approach for crack propagation due to this northward plate movement is also presented.

  • Work Shop
Location: Salon-V
Speaker
Biography:

Saif Aldeen Saleh Al Ryalat is a leading Researcher in several aspects of medicine, including genetic engineering and neurology. He is working on a project to design a bio-production system to design aglycosylated antibodies that can replace monoclonal glycosylated antibodies that are used in several neurological diseases (relatively high cost). He is also a peer Reviewer for several journals and a Researcher with several high impact publications. He is currently working at School of Medicine at The University of Jordan where he had several honors and certificates

Abstract:

As we previously stated in our first speech, the emerging technologies (e.g., CRISPR-Cas9) provided an opportunity to every scientist with innovative view to achieve his goal with minimal money and time. To get an overview about the importance of genetic research, 2 examples will be discussed in details in this regard; the highest cited article in NATURE is a genetic study entitled “An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome” that has more than 4200 citations in the past 4 years. The other example is what professors Gerngross and Hutchinson achieved in the years 2000 to 2006; they genetically modified the yeast Pichia pastoris to produce functional erythropoietin. In 2006, Merck offered 400 million in cash to buy their innovative invention and keep them on the head of their project but huge funding. With the emerging technologies that ease the genetic engineering, it is worth to think of an investment in this field, there are many similar examples where simple lab with few innovative scientists turned into “money factory”.